Center Of Excellence

//Center Of Excellence

Center of Excellence for Skill Development

In the era of globalization, manufacturing has undergone a paradigm shift in the way goods and products are produced due to large scale deployment of technology in the manufacturing process. In these circumstances local availability of competent workforce is one of the most decisive factors considered by investors in deciding on industry location. Hence it is imperative for us to succeed is by making available high quality technicians of international standards to satisfy the demand of skilled manpower. Given this scenario, it is important that the institutions create capacities to provide skilled manpower to attract and retain manufacturing industries in the state. Therefore, it becomes imperative that the current skill training institute shall be upgraded with capacity to train in relevant sectors especially in advanced and high technology manufacturing processes.

  • In today’s era of knowledge based economy, quality of workforce is more important than quantity.
  • Presently in India, Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector has not evolved to the international standards
  • The major skill gaps are at the fresher level as the students are not ‘Industry Ready’ pertaining to lack of exposer to latest technology.
  • Students who join the job market after getting their degrees and diplomas find that they do not possess technical skills required by the industries.
  • Industries are forced to recruit this semiskilled manpower and invest additional resources and time, as much as 18 to 24 months to increase efficiency.
Manufacturing

Manufacturing

India Industry alone needs 0.45 million skilled people a year, against that, only 0.15 million is available.

Infrstructure

Infrastructure

Current workforce of 48 million (2016) is expected to increase to 76 million by 2022.

Media

Media

Industry currently employs 0.4 million workforces in 2013 which is expected to reach 1.3 million by 2022

Center of Excellence for Skill Development

Globally, India’s 2011-12 GDP ranks 4th based on PPP (purchasing power parity) of $4.5 trillion and 9th on nominal $1.85 trillion economy. In India’s 2011-12 GDP, services sector accounts for 57.2% while industrial and agricultural sectors contribute 28.6% and 14.6% respectively. The manufacturing exports were projected to grow from US$40 billion in 2002 to approximately US$500 billion by 2022.” Thus the demand for industry –ready skilled workers comes both from outsourced Indian companies, as well as domestic industrial players. As the industrial sector expands, demand for skilled workers will grow.  To capitalize on this strong opportunity, India requires skilled resources. Industry alone needs 4.5 lakh skilled people a year, against that, only 1.5 lakh are available. The government has targeted 500 million people to be trained by 2022 to equip them with vocational skills and provide an efficient workforce for industries that often complain about a severe shortage of ‘employable’ workers.

  • By 2020, 25% of survey respondents see India among the world’s leading three destinations for manufacturing.
  • The Indian economy has the potential to become the world’s 3rd-largest economy by the next decade
  • FDI in manufacturing with100% FDI and other relaxations is to promote employment and improve infrastructure.
  • Modernisation of Defence
  • The economy of India is the seventh-largest economy in the world measured by nominal GDP and the third-largest by purchasing power parity (PPP) purchasing power parity)
  • The manufacturing exports were projected to grow from US$40 billion in 2002 to approximately US$500 billion by 2022.

In India, we have 623 districts that contribute to our skill reservoir. The total population of India is projected to rise to 1.3 billion (according to Population projection for India and states 2001 – 2026) in 2020 with; the proportion of population in the working age group (15-59 years) expected to rise 64.2%. Substantial rise in the working age population or a reduction in dependency ratio augurs well for growth momentum of the Indian economy,Population of 1.3 billion, of which about 0.8 billion in the working age – India in 2020 is surely something the world can look forward to. According to economic predictions, that time would be the golden ‘Growth’ era in the demographic dividend. This would not only have enough manpower to meet our needs but can help the rest of the world as well.In today’s era of knowledge based economy, quality of workforce is more important than quantity. In fact, having a lower head count of skilled manpower is much better than a manpower whose larger portion is unemployable. Considering the present situation, this is the future India is rushing towards. And this is one of the biggest challenges that India as a nation are ever going to face. Researches show that if India continues in the current pace, India would have a skill gap of 75-80% across Industry sectors. There will be people but with skills that corporate do not require, and jobs for which the right fit is not available. The economic impact of this vicious cycle is something one can estimate, but the social impact of having a powerhouse of educated yet frustrated youth who are directionless with no jobs in hand is unimaginable.

  • Presently in India, Technical, Vocational Education and Training (TVET) sector has not evolved to the international standards
  • The current skill training institute shall be upgraded with capacity to train in relevant sectors in advanced and high technology manufacturing processes.
  • The major skill gaps are at the fresher level as the students are not ‘Industry Ready’
  • Students who join the job market after getting their degrees and diplomas find that they do not possess technical skills required by the industries.
  • Non availability of high quality technicians of international standard and local availability of competent workforce is one of the most decisive factors
  • Industries are forced to recruit these semiskilled graduates and invest additional resources and time, as much as 18 to 24 months.
  • Improve Industry Participation in skill development.
  • Capacity Development of Faculty
  • Improve Infrastructure of Institutes
  • Improve Employment Opportunities in State
  • Entrepreneurship Development
  • Expand Vocational Training Infrastructure in State
  • Re-skilling and upskilling of employees
  • Collaborate with Industry Bodies/Associations

 

BE A PART OF SKILL INDIA